Author Archives: sandopolis

Giveaway Winners

Congrats to dorksdom and Autumn–winners of autographed copies of the first two novels in the ZC series. Thanks to everyone who entered–some of you had some awfully nice things to say about our books (if we win the lottery, or if Tours becomes a blockbuster movie, we’ll be sure to send autographed books to everybody who entered our first zombie blog contest). We had to substitute an old basket for the suspiciously missing plastic Halloween bucket, but here’s a  photo of the drawing as promised:

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Zombie Crawl 3! Giveaway! Part II!

So we wanted to share some of the fun we had at Fort Wayne’s Fantasticon this weekend and remind everyone about the ongoing Zombie Crawl giveaway.

First, a pic from our first “con” event–of all the monsters, mutants, and other creatures roaming the venue, our grandson was scared of this guy:DSCF3276.JPG

Our neighbor-table was a couple of young, amazing artists. Our sixth grader won a copy of the adorable ghost butt cartoon you can check out at karlicartoons.com

All in all, the weekend was a huge success, though we probably lost money overall. The vendors across from us, owners of Dragons Nest Unlimited, were the nicest people on the planet (which shouldn’t be surprising since they sell board games – we purchased our first Christmas present for this year from their booth).

As for the Zombie Blog Crawl (the blog “party” hosted by Band of Dystopian), we’ve had a couple entries to date. To enter our zombie crawl giveaway, email us at writevohs@earthlink.net with the label “zcbloggiveaway” in the subject line. All entered emails will be collected in an old plastic Halloween bucket, and our 11-year-old (likely wearing a batman mask) will draw the two winners on October 31st. We’ll take pictures and post the process.

A little redundancy isn’t a bad thing, so here is how the Zombie Crawl works:
Each day, the scheduled authors and bloggers will post awesome zombie-tastic content for your enjoyment along with a giveaway on their site/blog/page. You can hop around to all of the participating sites and enter as many giveaways as you like.
The easiest way to make sure you don’t miss a post is to join the Facebook event page where links are posted each time an author or blogger participates on their scheduled day.  https://www.facebook.com/events/1943815195845479/.
There are also have several flash giveaways on the event page as well as a grand prize giveaway on Band of Dystopian’s main page (http://www.bandofdystopian.com).
Happy Halloween!

 

 

Zombie Crawl 3! Giveaway!

Happy Halloween-we recently discovered the Zombie Blog Crawl, a “party” of sorts, hosted by Band of Dystopian. ZOMBIE CRAWL is an annual event where authors and bloggers post zombie-related content along with giveaways to celebrate zombie season. The Zombie Crusade series didn’t want to be left out of this z-holiday event, so we’re giving away two sets of autographed copies of the first two books in the series. To enter our giveaway, email us at writevohs@earthlink.net with the label “zcbloggiveaway” in the subject line. All entered emails will be collected in an old plastic Halloween bucket, and our 11-year-old (likely wearing a batman mask) will draw the two winners on October 31st. We’ll take pictures and post the process.

This is how the Zombie Crawl works:
Each day, the scheduled authors and bloggers will post awesome zombie-tastic content for your enjoyment along with a giveaway on their site/blog/page. You can hop around to all of the participating sites and enter as many giveaways as you like!
The easiest way to make sure you don’t miss a post is to join the Facebook event page where links are posted each time an author or blogger participates on their scheduled day.  https://www.facebook.com/events/1943815195845479/. There are also have several flash giveaways on the event page as well as a grand prize giveaway on Band of Dystopian’s main page (http://www.bandofdystopian.com).
You can use the schedule below to click through to each site. Make sure to leave comments and interact with the participating sites. Have fun, and thanks for joining the party!
OCTOBER 24 – Monday
OCTOBER 25 – Tuesday
OCTOBER 26 – Wednesday
OCTOBER 27 – Thursday
OCTOBER 28 – Friday
OCTOBER 29 – Saturday
OCTOBER 30 – Sunday
OCTOBER 31 – Monday
Grand Prize Giveaway

This is a weekend of firsts for us–we’re also participating in the Fantasticon in Fort Wayne at the Grand Wayne Center. We set-up our table before heading off to watch our high school senior’s sectional football game (our team won!). The merchandise and artwork that was already on display with only about half the vendors there was unbelievable. Between the Zombie Crawl and Fantasticon, this weekend promises to be the best kind of Halloween fun. It might even make us forget that the Cubs just suffered loss #2 against Cleveland . . .

 

 

 

 

 

A Novel Surprise

In general, I strongly dislike surprises. Now I’ve never won the lottery (although I did get a call from a gentleman with a thick accent who tried to convince me that I’d come in second place in the PCH sweepstakes and all I needed to do was wire a couple hundred dollars to some woman in Kansas to cover the taxes on my winnings in order for my new Cadillac and a giant check to be delivered to my door), though I will admit that it’s hard to win if you never purchase a ticket (don’t think that I’m not a risk taker–I just have basic math skills). So I’m not usually “pleasantly surprised” by the unexpected twists of everyday life. But I’ve been reading a draft screenplay of my first book, Tours (historical fiction focusing on the family of Charles Martel and the Battle of Tours), and even though I have nothing but affection and respect for Sony VP Josh Nadler, the author creating the screenplay, I wasn’t expecting to be riveted. I was expecting to be annoyed by the story line changes necessary to adapt the novel for film. I tend to like to be in charge of my world, and any worlds I create (whether based in history or in my imagination). I’d heard nothing but negative consequences from authors who’d allowed other people creative control over their work (Hemmingway described the situation as one where  the author should, “Drive to the border of California, throw your book over the fence. When they throw the money back over the fence, collect the money and drive home.”) So while there isn’t much money to be collected on my side of the fence (no surprise there), there is a sense of unexpected satisfaction that my first real novel has inspired a screenplay that I am proud to be associated with–even on the first draft. I didn’t see that coming.

Doomed to Repeat

I just saw a Facebook posting that said “Those who don’t know history are doomed to repeat it; those who do know history are doomed to watch others repeat it.” I shared this quote on my own page, and it may be my final commentary on anything of a political/social/economic nature there. Nobody is listening. I have a sneaking suspicion that most people see me as an annoying know-it-all who has no common sense. They may be right. But not this time, this time I know I am right.

I read a speech by Newt Gingrich in which he argues that American Muslims (American citizens who follow the religion of Islam), should be required to take a test to determine if they believe in Sharia. If the answer is yes, then they are to be deported. First of all, even I believe in Shariah. I believe it is the law Muslims are to try their best to follow, and it’s been around since the beginning of the religion. To deny its existence would seem to be on the shady side of insane, so I guess I believe it exists. Secondly, where do we deport American citizens to? Thirdly, isn’t this illegal according to the law (Constitution) our Founders left for us?

Look, I know we are all freaked out by Islamic terror to some degree. I have two sons in the service, and a third may soon join them. They may be in the safest place when it comes to Islamic terror. Where do we go? What do we do? Islamic terror can and does strike innocent people engaging in the most mundane tasks. Why shouldn’t we be a little freaked out about it? At the same time, I KNOW that the Constitution was designed especially for people the majority of citizens want to turn on. Oh, yeah, there have been times when we’ve ignored the Constitution when we were afraid. We locked up suspected Confederate sympathizers during the Civil War, indefinitely. We locked up and/or deported suspected Communist sympathizers in the years following WW I. We forced a quarter-million Americans of Japanese descent into internment (concentration) camps during WW II. We persecuted, and often ruined the professions and lives, of suspected Communist sympathizers following WW II. We did all of these things in violation of the Constitution.

Give America credit, we usually, eventually, make it right. We apologize. We award reparations. We apologize some more. Maybe we let you have casinos on your land. We have a conscience, eventually. I’m sure we’d someday know we overreacted by rounding up and expelling American Muslims (to where?), and we’d feel bad about it. But why do we have to go down this road again? Why are we doomed to repeat? Even worse, why do we so often lash out against non-threats? America is the strongest, most powerful nation on earth. Capitalism works, Democracy works. Our system can survive the Civil War, slavery, Communism, Hitler and Tojo, and the age of McCarthy. We survived 9-11. I’m fairly certain we can survive the minute percentage of American Muslims trying to do us harm. What we can’t survive, forever, is the defenestration of the Constitution.

Perils of Democracy

So I actually wrote a warm and fuzzy piece about kittens almost a week ago–inspired by the five orphan kittens currently eating us out of house and home. It sat patiently on my desktop, waiting for nothing in particular, until it disappeared into a parallel universe (the same universe that is home to single-socks from my clothes drier). I may even be able to retrieve the ode to kittens with a bit of effort (such as thinking hard about what I named the file), but recent world events have taken my thoughts in a different direction.

Athenians loved Democracy; everybody learned that in school, even if they forgot it. Other Greeks eventually tried to let people (demo) rule (cracy), with varying levels of success. Thebes was mighty powerful for a while—they put paid to the vaunted Spartans, for example. But in the end they died on the battlefield as the Macedonian monarch cut them to pieces. Democracy was mostly a phenomenon discussed by intellectuals for the next two millennia before the American colonists made use of the ancient political system, and eventually fought a revolution to keep the home-grown institution. The world has fallen in love with Democracy since the end of World War II; the majority of the people on our planet are living under democratic government. This is a positive development, isn’t it?

Maybe, maybe not. Sometimes voters vote for people and changes that really aren’t in their best interests. The Greeks did this too. Antiquity’s most famous historians, Herodotus and Thucydides, recorded some events in which Democracy turned out to be downright dangerous. Turns out that some folks are really good at convincing others to believe them, and vote for the changes they are advocating, even when the changes are stunningly ridiculous. The Greeks called those people demagogues. Athenians once voted to kill Socrates for an obviously trumped up charge made by a couple of his enemies. They also voted to execute their greatest military leader, a guy named Alcibiades, as he was leading a massive force against Syracuse. That force was entirely wiped out under the leadership of an idiot, and Athens went on to lose the Peloponnesian War against Sparta and her allies.

Democracy sounds good in theory, but the truth is that voters can do some very stupid things. Google just announced that the two most frequently googled questions in England today, the day after Britain voted to leave the European Union, were, “What effects will leaving the EU have on Britain,” and, “What is the EU?” The U.S. may elect Donald Trump in November, a man who says outlandish things and makes insane promises. Counties in Appalachia where more than ninety percent of citizens are on government assistance vote overwhelmingly Republican, the party always promising to cut government spending on the very programs these people are taking advantage of. In short, “the people” sometimes prove themselves to be poor judges of what’s actually in their best interest.

The Founding Fathers knew this was true, so they gave us a representative Democracy, also called a republic. They put the Electoral College in place to try to prevent the people from electing a dangerous person for president. Nevertheless, yesterday the British leadership allowed the people to decide if they should leave the European Union or stay. The question was incredibly simple, while the issue was insanely complex. Demagogues on both sides spewed their sound-bites and made their speeches, then the people went forth and voted. Parliament should have made the decision. In America, Congress would make a similarly serious decision.

Those Greeks I mentioned in the beginning? The wisest among them believed that the people would be safest with a philosopher-king or a group of guardians groomed for ruling. Of course, those ideas aren’t practical; even if you find people who can handle such power in a benevolent manner, history shows that there are very few such people in the world. I guess we’re stuck with Democracy. Sometimes we elect an Abraham Lincoln or Winston Churchill; sometimes we elect an Adolph Hitler or Neville Chamberlain. Sometimes, somebody decides to offer up some sort of referendum to the people. Usually, referendums concern a school funding plan or a neighborhood park. That’s about as far as direct Democracy should go. As always, this is just my opinion.

Summertime Resolutions

Honestly, I know it’s not the thought that counts. It’s the time, attention, and action that count—making a sincere declaration with no follow-through is worse than avoiding the issue altogether. In my household, we are masters of good intentions; I’d like to believe that we’re genuinely decent and trustworthy folks who are just easily distracted (I mean, we are bottle-feeding six orphan kittens right now), but we really need to work on making and sticking to some long-term goals.

For those of us whose Januarys consist of darkness, cold, and snow, New Years is an awful time to make a significant, behavior-changing resolution. Just getting out of bed on a cold mid-January morning should be considered a major life achievement, and I shouldn’t have to worry about getting my butt to the gym or not having dessert when I deserve to be rewarded for stumbling into a dark and freezing kitchen to push the coffee pot’s “on” button while the rest of my household is still resting peacefully.

Anyway, we are a house full of teachers and students. Summer is our season of freedom and opportunity. So from now on, every June I will make a summer resolution (even if I’m no longer bound by a traditional high school teacher’s schedule). And I will follow-through with that resolution.

It has been pointed out to me that writing my resolution down in a very public way will help keep me focused on my commitment, so what better first resolution for a writer trying to conquer ADD (or is it ADHD now?) than a resolution focused on writing? So here it is: I’m going to update this blog every week through the end of summer. I might even write more than one per week, but my goal is at least one. And I fully expect my family members and friends who’ve been bugging me about sharing my thoughts about life and liberty in a more public forum to read what they have wrought. You know who you are.

So this has been the first installment. Next topic:  kittens.